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Glider is too much bonded to me?
Glider is too much bonded to me?
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Jan 05 2017
03:35:35 PM
Hello! I have a female bonded pair that I have had for about 9 months now. One is 5 and is named Molly and the other is 2 and is named Lucy. Lucy has been with Molly ever since she was a baby. Molly and I have a very strong bond. She was easy to get along with: very laid back and loved people. Lucy and I have a bond but not as much as Molly and I. Lucy is a biter sometimes and is very skidish but I love her that way.
But recently Molly and Lucy have been crabbing at each other, chasing each other around the cage, and arguing over food.
Another thing is, around the same time that the arguing started, Molly has been getting up every morning when she hears me wake up and she sits at the door of the cage until I come get her, just so she can sit on my lap. Now, I'm not complaining. I think it's adorable but I'm just not used to it. She has never been a fan of being held and pet for long periods of time, she loves to play, but now she does it everyday. And today, she refuses to go back in her cage, but she is so tired and all she does is fall right asleep when she comes out. But I have to fight her to get her in the cage and when she is in there, she just sits at the door. Why is she doing this?
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Jan 05 2017
08:19:10 PM
Tveit_Momma Glider 165 Posts
I don't think there is a "too bonded", sometimes gliders just REALLY want to be with us for a few days. My boy usually crawls right out to me for 2-3 days then wants a cage-only day or two to rest. I've never heard of a bond between human and glider to cause problems between two cagemates, but sometimes they do just decide not to like each other for one reason or another and need to be separated. If they are arguing over food, try using two different food dishes and place one where the other cannot be seen.
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Jan 05 2017
08:31:01 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
Okay. Thanks for answering my question. And I use glider kitchens so I'm going to make another one tomorrow then
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Jan 06 2017
08:05:12 PM
kiwi3435 Face Hugger Visit kiwi3435's Photo Album kiwi3435's Journal FL, USA 687 Posts
I can relate to your situation. my one glider kiwi, is overly attatched to me and when i get dressed in the morning, she will jump to which ever side of the cage i am closer to and hiss/bark at me until give her attention. Also, whenever i am making too much noise in my room she will crawl out of her sleeping pouch and hiss at me until i take her out of the cage and allow her to crawl in my shirt. My other glider, kona, loves to spend time with me but isn't as attached to me as kiwi is. she will happily hop into the cage when it's time for them to be put up. however, whenever we do bathroom bonding she doesn't want to leave my shoulder or shirt. she will just watch kiwi jump around and play but doesn't do much playing herself.

i think it's all just in their personalities. It's difficult to get kiwi to go back in the cage sometimes but i kinda just have to work over it and compromise with her (usually involving treats!!)

The arguing between her cage mate might also be triggering her to come to you for comfort and attention. once the two of them fix their issues it might get her to be a little bit less clingy;)
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Jan 06 2017
08:32:51 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
Okay. Thank you for your response!
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Jan 10 2017
05:57:28 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
The suggies aren't arguing anymore, now that I have two glider kitchens in their cage. But the matter with Molly has only gotten worse. She won't sleep hardly at all unless I am holding her. I am at school during the day so I can't hold her all the time. My mom takes her out for about an hour a day but she has other things to do, you know. She said she is up all the time, roaming around the cage. But when it's time to eat or when it's night time, she is so tired from staying up all day. She can barely eat, and when she is done, she wants me to hold her and if I don't she'll just put her face down and fall asleep right there. It's almost like she has turned from sleeping at night to sleeping in the day. But she is so tired all the time, it scares me. Why is she doing this? Has this happened to anyone before? How do I stop it?
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Jan 10 2017
06:45:47 PM
BYK_Chainsaw Face Hugger Visit BYK_Chainsaw's Photo Album BYK_Chainsaw's Journal USA 555 Posts
some one posted on here that if gliders are having problems together, like tail biting or chasing that one could have parasites or a illness and a vet visit and fecal check could be in order.

We also have 2 or more sleeping areas, the gliders seem to like to sleep separately at time or with our large colony in all different kinds of groups. Like a box of chocolate, we open a pouch and never know WHO your going to get.
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Jan 10 2017
07:00:34 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
Okay. Thanks!
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Jan 10 2017
07:10:54 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2234 Posts
BYK_Chainsaw that was specific to the OP's description of his gliders behavior. Going after the tail, and or rear end of the other glider. http://www.sugarglider.com/glidergossip/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=59081

NOT saying this pair in this post shouldn't be vet checked, they probably should be.

Is there natural light in the room you have them in ?

Is it dark in the room they are in?

What diet are you feeding?

what is the room temp ?

when they are chasing each other what exactly are they doing?

Is one always the pursuer and the other the one being chased?

is the one that's not eating well dehydrated?

do you know how to do a tent test?

Is she mainly staying on the floor of the cage?

does she go in their pouch or avoid being in with the other glider?



Edited by - Leela on Jan 10 2017 07:15:39 PM
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Jan 10 2017
07:46:24 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
They don't chase each other around anymore. I think they were only chasing each other because of the food but ever since I put two separate places to eat, they have been fine.

There is only natural light in the room when I open the curtains.

It is semi-dark in there, a little bit of light still comes through the window but not a lot.

I'm not sure what the diet is called. The person I got them from just explained it to me and wrote it down on a piece of paper but they have been on it their entire life and have never had problems before.

The room temperature is in the 70's.

She is eating well, she just eats slowly. But eventually, she eats all her food. And I see her drink plenty of water so I don't think she is dehydrated.

I don't know how to do a tent test.

And yeah, she'll be on the top shelf usually. It's a single unit critter nation cage if that matters.

And she will go in their pouch sometimes. There are two pouches in the cage. About half of the time that she does go in the pouch, it's in her own pouch or with Lucy in her pouch.
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Jan 10 2017
07:52:24 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
And I'll just explain the diet. They get a variety of fresh fruits and veggies every day. I give them a cricket each every other day. And I always put vitamins and minerals and calcium on their food. I also give them a little bit of yogurt as a treat every or every other week.
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Jan 10 2017
07:52:37 PM
Tveit_Momma Glider 165 Posts
Could you give the ingredients of the food?
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Jan 10 2017
07:53:53 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
If she did have parasites or something like that, what would cause that?
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Jan 10 2017
08:00:11 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
What do you mean? Like what fruits and veggies I'm using?
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Jan 10 2017
08:04:49 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2234 Posts
Tent test is to check for dehydration. Pinch the skin on the middle of her back ( finger on one side of spine and thumb on other side of the spine ) If the skin stays up like a tent, she is dehydrated, if it goes right back to normal she isn't.

Start opening your curtains in the morning to let more light in during the day, sounds like her internal clock is out of wack probably from the room being on the darker side.

The diet, is not a consistent one nor does it sound like its balanced and giving them enough of what they need. You might consider getting them on one of the well known balanced diets for their long term health.

Personally I don't feed crickets at all, there is to much of a risk for aflatoxins.

sprinkling calcium and vitamins isn't the greatest way to make sure their needs are being met. To much can be just as bad as not enough. That's why we use well known diets with measured amounts of calcium and vitamins distributed evenly throughout the staple recipe. There doesn't seem to be much protein in the diet you are feedin either.

Just because they haven't shown signs or symptoms of the diet not being enough, doesn't mean it is enough. It takes time, sometimes a couple years for diet related signs and symptoms to physically show, by the time they do it's usually to late to reverse it or help.

This is not meant to be mean in any way, it's only meant to inform you so you can do some research on diets.

Edited by - Leela on Jan 10 2017 08:16:51 PM
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Jan 10 2017
08:07:53 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2234 Posts
If she were staying mainly at the bottom of the cage, away from cage mates those are also a sign of illness or medical issues.

Which was why I asked, if she's staying up top that's fine, and probably more related to her internal clock being out of whack. The natural light from opening the curtains in the morning should help but may take a week or two.


Edited by - Leela on Jan 10 2017 08:12:09 PM
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Jan 10 2017
08:17:24 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
Okay. I did the tent test and she isn't dehydrated.

I was feeding crickets because I have lizards and I would have some left over. Plus I read online that suggies like them. But if there is a risk for something, I think I'm going to stop.

And okay. What diet would you recommend?

Don't worry, I get it. Constructive criticism is a good thing.

I'll make sure to open the curtains more.
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Jan 10 2017
08:24:26 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
She has a little more energy tonight. And her and Lucy are getting along perfectly
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Jan 10 2017
08:25:44 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2234 Posts
Oh they do like em but they are a risk that I don't take.

Aflatoxin is deadly to gliders. Crickets raised in corn based bedding are at the highest risk of carrying aflatoxins to the gliders. Aflatoxins are also a problem in peanuts and some peanut products. Corn and peanuts produce mold in the right conditions, the mold is what's toxic.

There are many widely used diets out there and they can be confusing when your doing research. There are only two diets I promote and recommend Bml http://www.bmldiet.com/bml-recipe.html and Critter love hpw http://www.critterlove.com/diet-info.html

Both diets have been around for some time, are easy to make, are balanced and have undergone testing.

Bml you can find all the ingredients locally.
Critter love you have to order online.

Bml if you make a double batch will last two gliders a month.
I'm not sure how long hpw lasts for two gliders it should say on the site.

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Jan 10 2017
08:32:04 PM
Rhiannon Joey 15 Posts
Okay. Yeah I googled the aflatoxin and I'm not going to feed them crickets anymore. I'll check out the Bml diet because you said you can get everything locally.
Glider is too much bonded to me?

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Sugar Gliders
Glider is too much bonded to me?