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May 16 2017
01:20:25 PM
I've been thinking about getting sugar gliders for a while now, and every website I read up on says that they need to be bought in pairs. That it can be bad for their health to be alone.
So I was surprised to find that my local pet shop had one baby boy in a cage all by himself. I asked if this was a problem and they said that as long as I had sufficient time to spend with him that he would be fine on his own. I know pet shops don't always know as much as they should, especially when it comes to exotic pets, so I was inherently suspicious. I guess I have a few questions
A) Would the little guy live a happy life with just me?
B) I want to buy him regardless, but is there any special procedure to introducing him to another sugar glider if I could find him a companion?
C) He isn't fixed, so would another male be okay? Will they fight?
I'm clueless. I just don't want to leave him in that shop if he's hurting in any way. Any advice would be a blessing. Thank you
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May 16 2017
04:06:51 PM
BennyNace Glider Visit BennyNace's Photo Album 93 Posts
Some sugar gliders can live by themselves and not show any signs of depression. Of course like the pet store person said, you would need to spend alot of time with him. He may be able to live alone but he would be so much happier with a friend. You will be able to see a difference. Just keep an eye on him. Watch for things like not eating, over grooming, and odd repetitive behaviors (like doing circles on the cage roof)
When introducing another glider, you want to take it slow. A quarantine period is necessary to make sure the new glider is in good health. Also, a vet checkup may help verify that. Start with scent swapping. This involves trading bedding with the other gliders scent on it so they can get use to the smell of the other glider. When you introduce them, use neutral territory like a bathtub. Be ready to separate them if they start to fight. Oven mitts or another pouch can be kept handy to separate them. In the heat of the fight they will unintentionally bite you.
They may not fight if they remain in tact. However, the pros outweigh the consequences for neutering. Neutering can help minimize aggression also helps keep smell to a minimum. I would definitely suggest neutering.
Hope this helps. Good luck
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May 17 2017
01:56:36 AM
BYK_Chainsaw Face Hugger Visit BYK_Chainsaw's Photo Album BYK_Chainsaw's Journal USA 731 Posts
dogs are pack animals, but how many live with NO other dogs, and make their human owners their "pack" and live a happy life.
On the glider side, gliders are awake at night when you sleep, so how can you spend the needed hours with him? are you sleeping 11pm to 8 am? or can you give him 3-4 hours of buddy time.
I suggest getting 2, the cost ownership cost is not much more for food. and the nights you dont have time for him he has a buddy. but its more of an option then a requirement in my opinion.


question b. YES there are important introduction procedures.

question c. I would suggest getting them neutered, less smell. I'm not sure about the 2 intact males together is ok or not. ours are all neutered.
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May 17 2017
03:05:37 PM
sjusovare Face Hugger Visit sjusovare's Photo Album France 572 Posts
Dogs are pack animals.. yes.. and no... Dogs are wolves, wolves are not specifically pack animals, they are social as in they live in familly units with the pups of previous litters, but that ends there, older ones are chased away and many are solitary, which is not the same with gliders who do live in colony in the wild and never stay alone for really long, they graft themselves on other colonies or join newly formed groups... That makes the comparison hazardhous.

That being said, some gliders do well by themselves, providing their human spend lots of time with them (which doesnt mean that it is ideal), and from observation, even lone gliders have a totally different behavior once in a group.

For introduction, it is advised that both animals have the same weight/size, and introductions should be made in neutral ground to avoid territorial issues.

Intact males might not necessarily fight providing there is no female in the house, that the introduction is successful and that they are housed in a new cage afterwards (or at least one which has been made odor neutral and in which the items have not been previously claimed by one), especially if they are introduced when young (I've never had issues here, and none of my males are neutered). However, the risk are higher when trying to introduce adults which are more territorials.

Edited by - sjusovare on May 17 2017 03:15:19 PM
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Sugar Gliders
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