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Sugar Gliders
Dominance wound - help!
Dominance wound - help!
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Aug 07 2017
12:28:24 AM
So I woke to an uplessant surprise the other night. I heard my two unaltered males (no females in the house) crabbing at each other. I found my younger one (3-5 years old) on top of my older (4-7). I believe he was trying to mount him honestly. Anyways, he had ahold of him pretty good. I finally got him to let go, and got my older one to the vet to make sure he didn't need stitches. They said he didn't and gave me some oral antibiotics to give him. It's day 3 of the healing process and it's about closed up completely so I'm very thankful.

Should I get the younger one fixed? Maybe both of them? I've never seen the older one be aggressive at all. The younger one never has been either until now. I'm worried about getting them fixed with their age, especially considering that my ages for them are approximate since I rescued them from people who weren't entirely sure how old they were.

Also, the younger (aggressive) one has been known to have what is possibly absent seizures? There have been two times when he was in stressful situations (new people, a lot going on, etc) where he freezes up doesn't really respond. One time he even slumped over when I sat him in his cage and was a little wet on the mouth almost like drool. I took him to the vet (and sadly there aren't any that seem to be well versed in gliders here) who said that he looked healthy and there wasn't really a way to prove seizures but to let her know if they got worse. Luckily he has only had those two and I've had him about 3 years (they were recent but none that I've seen in past 2-3 months).

Anyways, I'm worried about fixing him or if there is a way to prevent this. I've got them separated in the meantime while Creature heals, and will let them play supervised in another day or two once he finished his antibiotics. Any advice?!
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Aug 07 2017
01:34:14 AM
lilsistar Super Glider Visit lilsistar's Photo Album 290 Posts
Neutering them will definitely help with smells, but doesn't always help with dominance.

My male was neutered at 8 months and is still very dominant. He can't stand other males! If a female smells like another male he will go after her too.

I'm no vet or health expert. I have no idea if your gliders will have problems during the procedure because of age or because of other health problems.
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Aug 07 2017
07:54:08 AM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2444 Posts
age for neutering usually becomes a concern at about 9/10 yrs old and up. The older they are the higher the risk of complications from the anesthesia.

Not much you can do about environmental seizures except minimize the triggers ( dim lights etc... )

My advice, keep them separated until the wound is completely healed and fur has regrown, and get some vetericyn VF for any future neck wounds. https://www.amazon.com/Vetericyn-Wound-Skin-Care-Spray/dp/B006UJGZNG

Ask your vet questions about their neutering procedure and what method they use, if they even do them. If your vet isn't well versed in gliders they may not even have the equipment or experience to neuter them. Personally I prefer lazer pom off, the healing time is quicker and lower risk of complications.





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Aug 12 2017
03:23:36 PM
Devansmain Starting Member 5 Posts
I'm more of an eBay person rather than Amazon so I ordered this: www.ebay.com/itm/171899841499

This will be fine right? Looks to be the same stuff but I just want to be sure. This will keep infection away? So if he gets bit again no need to take him back to the vet? He is all healed up now so I'm gonna let them play supervised tonight, and will wait to cage them together permanently until I get the spray.

Thank you!!
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Aug 12 2017
04:40:46 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2444 Posts
yes that's the right stuff. It's safe to spray on wounds, scratches, eyes, nose even the mouth if need be.

I can't say a future wound won't require vet care, that really depends on the severity of the wound , location, infection etc... but the spray will help keep it clean and heal quicker
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Aug 12 2017
10:57:48 PM
Devansmain Starting Member 5 Posts
I guess what I'm asking is will this spray act as an antibiotic and keep infection away? I'm fairly confident that I can safely determine whether or not a wound needs vet assistance based on how big it is, where its at, etc. I'm assuming anything gaping open or actively bleeding would need to see a vet?

So I let them play. Put them in the same cage and they immediately balled up. I decided that wasn't a good idea so I took them into the bathroom (no tent at the moment) - with toilet lid closed etc of course - and they ran right to each other pretty aggresively. I hissed and kinda pulled at one of them and they left each other alone. Through a very slow process of sniff sniff treat treat I got them acting KINDA civil. I'd say it was about 30 minutes. The aggressive one (Casper) is still putting his ears back and making funny faces. :(

When first seeing each other out in the open bathroom, poor Casper had another seizure. First one I've seen in at least a month or two (three or four total now). He twitches with his mouth open like he does and then froze up / drooled a little bit. He was back to normal a lot faster than usual though.

Sigh.. this is so stressful. :(
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Aug 13 2017
12:25:44 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2444 Posts
No, it's not an antibiotic or work like an antibiotic.

It's an anti bacterial spray which helps prevent infections, it will not get rid of an infection. If the wound is bad enough and not treated properly it still has a chance of infection even with the vetericyn.

There is new information out right now possibly pertaining to neck wounds. There is a proven bot fly parasite case in a glider.

We are now suggesting gliders with neck wounds get a bacterial C & S test done and mention to the vet about the bot fly specifically.

Because the other glider is still aggressive towards the one that had the neck would I'd be having some fecal tests done on both and the bacterial C & S test done on the one that the wound.



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Aug 13 2017
09:16:18 PM
Devansmain Starting Member 5 Posts
Good news - they played pretty well tonight. Some smelling each other, some grooming, and they even got in the same pouch! I've got them separated again because I don't trust him just yet..

Any idea about how much the tests cost? I understand that some gliders sense issues with another, so I think it would be a good idea.

~Josh
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Aug 13 2017
09:19:07 PM
Devansmain Starting Member 5 Posts
Also, about how much do the fecal tests run? I'm worried about these tests because I can't find a vet in my area who seems very knowledgeable with them. Are these tests something any vet can perform?
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Dominance wound - help!

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Sugar Gliders
Dominance wound - help!