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Philosophy behind rehoming fees?
Philosophy behind rehoming fees?
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Oct 31 2018
08:47:05 AM
Have started looking around again to find a new companion for my suddenly solo glider since his cage mate died and once again noticed every ad asks for rehoming fees. I'm not against them per se but was wondering what the thought process is behind them. In my past experience with dogs and cats, the owners are usually so concerned about finding a good home for their pet (for whatever reason they are having to rehome) that asking for fees is the last thing they think of.

I've considered giving up my solo glider to get him to a good home with a companion as another alternative to me getting him a companion in my home and I don't understand why I'd ask for a rehoming fee if I could get him into a good home so can someone explain to me how the fee helps ensure he gets into a good home? Is it a matter of making sure the recipient has sufficient funds to care for a glider? If so, wouldn't asking questions about the home and their would-be owner's experience or knowledge level be better?

I don't want to offend other owners nor do I want to endanger my own should I decide he's better off in another home so would really appreciate an explanation of the philosophy behind rehoming fees.
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Oct 31 2018
10:59:06 AM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2919 Posts
what a great topic to discuss over my morning coffee

personally I don't always feel rehoming fees prove who is a "good" potential or a reason to dismiss someone completely.

However I also feel that if a person can not pay a REASONABLE rehome fee they may also not be able to afford vet care for the glider.

Vet bills can become substantial veryyyyyy quickly, even if you can afford a reasonable rehome fee and if they are not able to provide vet care the animal will potentially suffer for their lack of funds. Gliders unlike dogs or cats require exotic vets and there is a considerable price difference for medical care.

Also in general I think a lot of people try to recoup some of the money they invested in the glider/s and what ever they come with.

If the gliders come with safe recommended cages wheels etc...and are fairly new or well taken care of sometimes they are a pretty goood deal and are sometimes the most economical way for someone new to get started without having to invest as much money ... so it depends on what they come with and how you look at it.


There are some individuals that don't have rehome fees, from what I have seen they are usually on a time restraint and need to rehome them quickly or the glider needs urgent medical care the owner can't provide. Personally I have had several gliders either given or surrendered to me for various reasons.

Having said that...... nothing is ever free. Taking in gliders is not cheap even if you don't pay a rehome fee and everytime you take one it you can potentially expose your current gliders to something contagious.



The above is speaking about individuals that rehome. The following is pertaining rescues and people who work with surrenders and rescues....

When rescues or foster homes rehome gliders their rehome fee is usually only enough to cover neuters and or medical care that they have provided out of their own pocket. The fees also help provide for new gliders coming into the rescue or foster so they have equal standards of care as the gliders that were previously adopted out.

Most often rescues and foster homes take a financial hit on the adoption fees and don't charge all of what was actually invested.

They usually have a protocol in place and ask a lot of questions to see if the potential new owner will meet the foster or rescues standards. They won't dismiss new owners just for the sake of being new if the new owner is willing to learn.

There are however many people that foster and work to rehome gliders that will wave an rehome fee for the right glider, person and or situation and do their best to HELP someone keep their glider rather than feeling like they need to rehome them.

I've worked with rehoming gliders in the community and have a few resources nation wide that may be able to help you find a cage mate for your single if you really feel he needs one. But I would first determine that he does in fact need one before you make the decision to either rehome him or get a cagemate.






Edited by - Leela on Oct 31 2018 11:19:01 AM
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Oct 31 2018
11:33:00 AM
BYK_Chainsaw Fuzzy Wuzzy Visit BYK_Chainsaw's Photo Album BYK_Chainsaw's Journal USA 1123 Posts
My understanding is craigslist bans the selling of animals. but a fee for the
tranfer of an animal is ok. it basically goes around that rule.

My wife and I are looking to get rid of our second colony of 5, since we paid $ for them, and some are white which sell for more $ she would like to get some
money for them. I just want to get them to a good forever home.

also I think of it this way, if you can't afford a $400 for a pair of gliders,
then how can you afford the $200 vet bill, the $275 cage bill, the $40 cage accessory bill, the $40 running wheel bill and the every month $30 food bill.
If you buy tires for a corvette, you can pay like $1600 or more, but since you
paid $50,000 for the car that cost should be in your income range.

I would hate for the gliders to go to somebody who suddenly couldn't afford
the food to feed them, or a vet visit if they need one. I think a re-homing fee
does help make it so someone with no or little money won't decide to give getting a glider a try.

If I knew the person getting the gliders could take care of them no problems, I would give them our second colony. (but my wife wants some $)

Edited by - BYK_Chainsaw on Oct 31 2018 11:36:22 AM
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Oct 31 2018
11:51:59 AM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2919 Posts
Also keep in mine state laws. Here in fla it is illegal to ask for a rehome fee or sell gliders UNLESS you have a usda licence.

There is a loop hole though which I won't divulge and the laws aren't always enforced.

But before buying, advertising or selling KNOW your state law they do occasionally troll craigslist and other selling forums to nail people.

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Oct 31 2018
02:31:35 PM
Paani Glider Visit Paani's Photo Album Paani's Journal 87 Posts
Thanks for the replies. I always figured some of the impetus behind stating rehoming fees was to recover the "investment", hadn't been aware of the prohibition against selling animals on Craigslist.

I would submit the desire to ensure the prospective new owner is financially capable is not specific to gliders and I'm still not sure how paying the former owner a fee ensures the new owner will be able to pay emergency vet bills. The number of ads I've seen that essentially said "I need to find a new quality home for my suggies fast ... but I want $$$" just kind of struck me funny.

I am also curious about the idea that the survivor might not need a cagemate. He was looking awfully sad and lonely today but that may also have to do with being in the spare cage rather than the big flight cage that has generally been his home (I want to make sure I get that cage cleaned and sanitized since I don't know why his "brother" died.

I have a line on either a single or a pair of gliders locally that are looking for new homes. Bad time for the unexpected rehoming fees but when is there a good time? LOL
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Oct 31 2018
03:41:56 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2919 Posts
since you don't know why the one died (which is not at all uncommon) it would be wise to take the survivor in for fecals and a wellness exam before even considering bringing in more gliders.

Especially if the survivor is showing abnormal signs, he may already have something the other one had a lot of times illnesses are contagious and spread quickly. Often times illness is mistaken for loneliness and or depression from losing a cage mate.

Despite what you may find online...sometimes gliders do just fine being single, with a little more time spent with the human.

Currently I just got home from a 2 month long visit out of town. A week after I left one of my gliders passed after a very long 2 yr battle with a bacterial infection. His cage mate Leela has been by herself ever since and doing just fine.

I have 2 other colonies in 2 other cages so you would think I would have a few options for her to go in with someone else. Yesterday I did a cold intro with the calmest most accepting colony of 3... Leela wanted to fight with 2 of them.

I've done loads of intro's and out of all them she is the hardest to pair up and get along with long term though with me she has the sweetest disposition. She doesn't do well with smaller and younger than her gliders, or females except one in the handicapped cage.... which limits my options to introducing her to the handicapped cage butttttt one of the 3 I already know I would have to pull as she is smaller and another of them is a tripod and I don't know how she will be with him. So then I'd have at least 2 intro's to do instead of one.

So my options are remove Cozig and try an intro or leave Leela as a single. Single really wouldn't bother me as she is very content in the cage by herself and is showing no signs of being lonely or depressed but on the other hand....I would like to be down to 2 cages.

I really haven't decided which route I'm going to go with but my point is, know your glider and what THAT gliders needs are. What other people say and think are irrelevant the glider is YOURS and it is up to you to figure what is in his best interest, whether that is staying with you as single, you acquiring another glider to try an intro with or rehoming him... only you can know what the best choice is for him.

As for me? I knowwwwwwwww Leela will be content by herself rather than forced into a colony she isn't going to get a long with. As soon as she showed aggression towards the 2 gliders the intro was over. That was my cue from her that she does not want to be with them, at least right now.







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Oct 31 2018
04:49:08 PM
Paani Glider Visit Paani's Photo Album Paani's Journal 87 Posts
Thanks Leela, good info and sorry for your own loss. I'll see if I can get him in for the wellness exam tomorrow or Friday.

One of the reasons I went with gliders over a dog was that I work and travel a lot so I thought they could keep each other company during the spells that I'm not able to devote a lot of personal attention to them.

I've got foraging toys and 2 different types of wheels in both cages so there are things to occupy his attention and time when he's alone. It sounds from your experience like that possibly might be enough -- still not sure but at least it seems it I may have some time to watch and observe rather than rush to get him new companionship.
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Oct 31 2018
05:02:57 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2919 Posts
yeh don't be in a rush, people get into a panic and rush to get cage mates especially when 1 of 2 pass away and a lot of people tell them to do that. Personally I don't think that it's good advice.

How long have you had him? is he neutered? have you ever done introductions before?
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Oct 31 2018
07:33:59 PM
Paani Glider Visit Paani's Photo Album Paani's Journal 87 Posts
quote:
Originally posted by Leela

yeh don't be in a rush, people get into a panic and rush to get cage mates especially when 1 of 2 pass away and a lot of people tell them to do that. Personally I don't think that it's good advice.

How long have you had him? is he neutered? have you ever done introductions before?



I've had him nearly 9 years now. He and his "brother" were both neutered as soon as they were old enough. I did intros before when I adopted the Hawaiian rescues. The first intros were dicey ... it took about 3-4 weeks of having them living in separate cages close enough to smell each other but with visual blockers before I was able to conduct a successful intro (mainly because of this one -- he was a bully and mean to the Hawaiian rescues at first).

Ironically, I don't think he likes being alone, I think he just wants to be comfortable with his eventual cage mates before actually living with them.
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Oct 31 2018
08:17:46 PM
Leela Goofy Gorillatoes Gliderpedia Editor Visit Leela's Photo Album Leela's Journal 2919 Posts
thats a long time I'm sure he misses his brother and is grieving as much as you are but it will pass hopefully for both of you.

The last glider I took in was the last glider of a his family colony he was the youngest of them at 13 yrs old when he came to me. I was asked by my friend the owner to take him because he travels a lot and quite frankly I don't think he could bear to watch his last baby pass. He lives just around the corner from me so he could also visit him anytime... So he came here and was introduced to the colony I tried to introduce Leela to yesterday. He went right in with them with no issues what so ever but passed a few short weeks later.

His owner did what he thought was best for Boomer and I was very honored to have gotten the time I did with him while he was here he was very content with his new friends and knew he was very loved.

Anyway, I do believe gliders grieve but I also believe like us humans it gets a little easier for them over time and they deserve that grieving time as much as we do, that's part of why I think it's wrong to rush on getting new cage mates. Boomer was by himself for about a month before his owner could bring himself to make the decision he did. He knew Boomer needed a new colony... That's what I mean by KNOW your glider and what HE needs, they are all so very different





Edited by - Leela on Oct 31 2018 08:18:29 PM
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Dec 08 2018
10:29:22 PM
Mhamilton85 Starting Member 9 Posts
I absolutely agree that you should take things slowly and decide on a cage mate if and only if he's showing signs of being lonely or depressed.

As for rehoming fees I chose to post an ad that I was able to take in a new glider or pair but I was not looking to "buy" one. Each time I was contacted by owners that just wanted their gliders to have a better life rather than trying to make a buck. As far as I'm concerned having a pet is an investment in the love of the animal not something that can be "recouped". All 3 of the owners I adopted from still text me occasionally to ask how they are doing or for a quick picture of them happy. I wouldn't even consider paying a "rehoming fee". A new glider requires a good amount of money to be sure that they are healthy and to get them adjusted. That's where my money belongs. Not in the hands of an old owner.

Good luck! I'm sure over the next weeks or months it will be clearer what you should do.

Meredith
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Dec 10 2018
12:26:11 AM
BYK_Chainsaw Fuzzy Wuzzy Visit BYK_Chainsaw's Photo Album BYK_Chainsaw's Journal USA 1123 Posts
quote:
Originally posted by Mhamilton85

I absolutely agree that you should take things slowly and decide on a cage mate if and only if he's showing signs of being lonely or depressed.

As for rehoming fees I chose to post an ad that I was able to take in a new glider or pair but I was not looking to "buy" one. Each time I was contacted by owners that just wanted their gliders to have a better life rather than trying to make a buck. As far as I'm concerned having a pet is an investment in the love of the animal not something that can be "recouped". All 3 of the owners I adopted from still text me occasionally to ask how they are doing or for a quick picture of them happy. I wouldn't even consider paying a "rehoming fee". A new glider requires a good amount of money to be sure that they are healthy and to get them adjusted. That's where my money belongs. Not in the hands of an old owner.

Good luck! I'm sure over the next weeks or months it will be clearer what you should do.

Meredith



Here is my issue, Lots of people are online asking FULL $200 price for a
standard grey. soo.....
I have a second colony of 5 I would let to get to a Forever/good/quality
owner. (My wife would like a few dollars as we have about $500 invested.) some
of the gliders are white so worth more. If I just advertise to give them away
it seems like a very good chance I could get someone that will just want to resell
them, separate them up, or do whatever it takes to make some money off them.
Just look at my local pet store, when they have a gliders its in a tiny cage with no wheel and a pelt diet. They don't care about the glider, just making a good
profit as they put high prices on them.

I see at least charging half price a chance I won't get slick willy looking
to take them just to make a buck off them.
I'd try to convince my wife to give them away to someone that would be a
good owner, or even agree to give back the money if someone agrees to own them for
3 years...something like that.
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Dec 10 2018
02:20:44 AM
Paani Glider Visit Paani's Photo Album Paani's Journal 87 Posts
I ended up getting Judah a new cage mate and she just finished quarantine so I moved her cage next to the main one (about 2-2.5 inches of separation) this morning. This evening they both woke up and realized something is different. Nala saw Judah and was quietly watching him although he was typically male and went looking for food first.

Nalas prior owners stated upfront in their ad (here) that they didnt want to sell Nala but instead wanted to talk to the prospective new owner. I ended up sending them pictures and even an impromptu video to show them I was a real person and that I actually had the cage I claimed. I insisted on paying them something for Nalas cage and pouches and toys (although in retrospect I probably should have given them more than I did).

The ads I see on Craigs List just make me sick. Perhaps I should put one up myself like Merediths. A cage like mine could (should?) support a larger colony....
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Dec 10 2018
11:46:30 AM
BYK_Chainsaw Fuzzy Wuzzy Visit BYK_Chainsaw's Photo Album BYK_Chainsaw's Journal USA 1123 Posts
I've seen where they request 6 to 8 inches of cage separation, the
length of the tail, so that can't be grabbed and bitten threw the
cage bars.
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Dec 10 2018
02:30:51 PM
Paani Glider Visit Paani's Photo Album Paani's Journal 87 Posts
quote:
Originally posted by BYK_Chainsaw

I've seen where they request 6 to 8 inches of cage separation, the
length of the tail, so that can't be grabbed and bitten threw the
cage bars.



I could see that being a concern but there's no way their tails are going through the mesh of the main cage. I really don't see that happening with this pair but will think about it a bit more and perhaps increase the separation just to be safe.
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Mar 03 2019
11:26:57 PM
Kieraa Joey 17 Posts
I think re-homing fees are important. They do it in Animal Shelters to make sure that you can provide a home for the animal, It's mainly proof that you can provide for the animal. Some re-homing fees can look pretty high.. depending on the 'breed' of the glider (Standard Grey is going to be much cheaper than a Leu) in the long run, people just want to either profit off of their sugar glider or they'd like to actually re-home it to somebody loving and fit to care for it.

My experience recently with one of my boys was the cage mate had just passed on not too long ago and the person was asking for a reasonable amount for a re-homing fee. Met up with the person and brought my gliders along she just wanted to make sure that he was going to be going to a person that could take care of him.

Now when I adopted my other boy, that's a different story. I saw a picture of my oldest boy on CL and fell in love with him, cage with a set ect; was perfect. Then she started jacking the 're-homing fee price' up because there was a breeder that wanted him. When I finally met up with her and picked him up he was clearly neglected which was really sad. She backed me into a corner with a 're-homing fee' that was actually a 'sale'
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Mar 04 2019
03:58:07 PM
ChipandDalesMom Joey Visit ChipandDalesMom's Photo Album 31 Posts
Rehoming fees are sometimes charged to recoup medical care for a rescued glider. I drove 6 hrs each way to pick up a colony of 5 that were in an illegal state then had to pay for fecals, vet exams, and provide safe pouches, toys, and alot of staple diet (for 5) in addition to travel costs. I will never recoup all of my costs, but if I decide to rehome all/ some of the girls I will charge a fee and send the extra cage/supplies, & staple diet to start them with if needed.
Philosophy behind rehoming fees?

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Philosophy behind rehoming fees?